Repair or Replace

Repair or Replace

In these days of shortages of household money it may be wise to re-evaluate decisions on whether to repair what you have as compared to replace with a new piano.If you have an older piano, these things are true.  Trying to keep your head above water as to never have more invested in something than what you can sell it for.  In general, full size upright pianos, have little or no resale value. That means, except for sentimental feelings, putting money into your older upright is an exercise in a losing proposition.  For grand pianos, the rule of life expectancy exists which is , “the general life expectancy of a piano with original parts is about 75 years”  Once again, people will not pay a good amount of money for an old piano more than 75 years old.  Pianos that have cosmetic issues are not good candidates for putting a lot of money into because of resale value.All this means that if you must keep your older piano, invest enough to make it usable but do not go overboard as you will not get a monetary return if you trade it.  Tuning is the one thing that can make your piano sound it’s best.  If the piano does not sound in tune no one will want to play it.  Likewise, it should be up to standard pitch of A-440 to do the pianist any good.  Minor things should be taken care of like removing lost motion in the keys and just making all the keys work.If you have the money to replace, keep in mind that this is still a buyers market.  Choosing a piano with a simple case design has nothing to do with the quality of the piano.  Choosing a new piano that has an odd color or outdated design will often go at lower prices.  Even though pianos cost a lot of money the length of time they last makes a high cost a little more livable.

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